Sunday, 21 May 2017

Sunday Stitch School - Lesson 22: Vault Stitch

Today's stitch is yet another one from the Cross Stitch family, and belongs to Canvas stitches.

Vault Stitch is also known as Fan Vaulting and Church Roof Stitch. No Swedish name has been found. Let me know if you have any other names for this stitch.
Mattia suggests, Point de Voûte.

I discovered it in Mary Thomas's Dictionary of Embroidery Stitches, where it is worked in the order of the purple stitch:
This way a LOT of thread is needed.
With yellow thread I changed the stitching to save thread.
Compare the back:


Once you have got the rhythm, you will get 'hooked' and work the stitches fast.

This is what it looks on my Aida sampler:

Homework:
Fill this square with orange and yellow Vault Stitch.

18 comments:

  1. It's a lovely, dramatic stitch, isn't it. Although the order of stitching given by Mary Thomas uses a lot of thread, it probably pulls the base fabric less than the more economical ordering, and creates a firmer fabric. Whether that matters or not depends on the project, of course!

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    1. You are absolutely right, and as this is a canvas stitch the thicker, double sided stitches would be good for the seat of a chair for example.

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  2. Kinda nice, maybe for a border on Sue's skirt.

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    1. I hope it will have a more dramatic effect when worked in two colours.

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  3. I like how the two directions look side by side.

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    1. I think this is the real charm point. It could be a fancy individual stitch, but best for filling.

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  4. Have you tried it on a fabric other than aida? I bet it would be quite difficult to keep neat [for me anyway!]

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    Replies
    1. I have yet to do my homework, which will be on evenweave, so no, I haven't tried it on other than Aida. I love Aida as a beginner's fabric - where to put the stitches is easy to see. I wonder how neat I will be able to make the stitches.

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  5. Great stitch. I also tried the Mary Thomas version and the more economical one and agree with rachel.

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    Replies
    1. For something sturdy, like a seat on a chair, a stitch that fills both the back and from is best. If you use it only for decoration I think you can skimp on the thread and use the surface stitch version.

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  6. had not known that it was also called Church roof stitch thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. I must admit I have not seen roof slates of such shape on churches in the UK, or am I wrong?

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  7. Such a good idea to change the stitching to safe thread. Love the row you stitched on Aida, it would make a pretty CQ seam.

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    Replies
    1. Saving thread was very important in the past, especially in rural areas where thread was hard to come by. You can see a lot of surface Satin Stitches in Swedish wool embroidery, and I was thinking of that when I changed the stitching order to save thread. The con is that the stitched surface is not as sturdy as the original stitch.

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  8. Very decorative and beautiful with many possible variations.
    Have a great day and thanks for sharing.

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    1. I think it looks best as a filling, but individual stitches will add an interesting touch to e.g a floral display.

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  9. The stitch as you have it on Aida, is really pretty.
    Nice to know there are no horses involved with the vaulting.

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    Replies
    1. No gymnastics needed to stitch this one! Maybe the name refers to the rotation of the stitch when you fill an area.

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